twitter facebook icon-envelope arrow-down arrow-up
Photo of a mother and her baby.

Extremely sad, anxious, and withdrawn after giving birth?

It’s not your fault. It could be postpartum depression (PPD). Consider participating in the Robin research study.

To see if you may qualify, please call (844) 901-0101 to speak with a study representative, or fill out the contact form and a study representative will follow up with you.

Complete Form

Now enrolling: This research study is evaluating the efficacy and safety of an investigational oral medication in women with postpartum depression (PPD).

Learn About PPD

Being a new mom presents its own challenges, but when symptoms of PPD, such as extreme sadness, severe anxiety, and hopelessness, get in the way, you need to do something about it. After all, caring for yourself is as important as caring for your new baby and the rest of your family. 

PPD is a biological complication of pregnancy. During pregnancy, levels of certain hormones rise and then rapidly fall after giving birth.In some women, these hormone shifts may contribute to PPD. Symptoms may include:

  • Sadness, tearfulness, or hopelessness
  • Outbursts or irritability, even over small matters
  • Anxiety or restlessness
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt
  • Trouble bonding with your baby
  • Thoughts of harming yourself or your baby

If you are experiencing symptoms of PPD or have been diagnosed with PPD, you and your doctor may have developed a treatment plan to ensure your well-being. Participating in a research study is another option you could consider and discuss with your doctor. 

To see if you may qualify, please call (844) 901-0101 to speak with a study representative, or fill out the contact form and a study representative will follow up with you.

Complete Form

Photo of a mother looking down with a baby in her arms.

In the US, estimates of new mothers identified with PPD each year vary by state from 8% to 20%, with an overall average of 11.5%.2

About the Robin Study

This research study is evaluating the efficacy and safety of an investigational oral medication in women with PPD. An investigational medication is a study drug that will be tested during a study to see if it is safe and effective for a specific condition and/or group of people.

If you qualify and decide to participate, you will be required to take the assigned study drug at home every night for 14 days. You’ll have nightly phone calls with the study coordinator and will come into the study site three times while on the medication and two times as follow-up. Your total participation will last about 76 days.

To see if you may qualify, please call (844) 901-0101 to speak with a study representative, or fill out the contact form and a study representative will follow up with you. If you pre-qualify, the study representative will schedule a screening visit to discuss additional details with you and help answer any questions you may have.

Study eligibility is determined during the screening visit. During the visit, you will:

  1. Meet with the study doctor and staff
  2. Review additional information
  3. Have an initial evaluation and undergo tests
  4. Complete study questionnaires
If you participate in the Robin Study, your PPD symptoms will be continually monitored by qualified study staff (nurses and clinicians), under the guidance of the study doctor. You will also receive study-related medical care and the assigned study drug at no cost.

To see if you may qualify, please call (844) 901-0101 to speak with a study representative, or fill out the contact form and a study representative will follow up with you.

Complete Form

How Do I Qualify?

To be eligible for the study, you must:

  • Be 18 to 45 years of age
  • Have given birth within the last 6 months
  • Frequently feel extremely sad, anxious, or overwhelmed, and these symptoms are associated with PPD
  • Have symptoms that began no earlier than the third trimester and no later than the first four weeks following delivery

The study doctor will discuss additional requirements.

Your participation in the Robin Study is completely voluntary. If you decide to participate in this research study, you are always free to withdraw at any time for any reason without any penalty or effect on your future medical care.

If you qualify and decide to participate:

  • You will receive study-related medical care and the assigned study drug provided at no cost
  • Transportation may be provided for those who require assistance

To see if you may qualify, please call (844) 901-0101 to speak with a study representative, or fill out the contact form and a study representative will follow up with you.

Complete Form

Frequently Asked Questions

This section will help answer some of the important questions you may have.

Photo of a mother sitting on a chair with her baby.

Want to learn more?

To see if you may qualify, please call (844) 901-0101 to speak with a study representative, or fill out the contact form and a study representative will follow up with you.

Complete Form

If you need immediate help, or you feel you may harm yourself or your baby, please dial 911 or your local emergency number. You can also call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-8255, available 24 hours a day.

Share this information

  1. National Institute of Mental Health. Postpartum Depression Facts. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/postpartum-depression-facts/index.shtml. Accessed September 28, 2016.
  2. Ko JY, Rockhill KM, Tong VT, Morrow B, Farr SL. Trends in Postpartum Depressive Symptoms — 27 States, 2004, 2008, and 2012. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 66(6);153–158.

Thank you for your interest in the Robin Study.

Close